Your Questions About Successful Trading System

Thomas asks…

History Help….pls 10PTS!!!!!!!!!!?

According to historians, the central link or “linchpin” of the Atlantic trading system was:

A Sugar

B Tobacco

C European manufactured goods

D The traffic in slaves

Question 7

According to the Norton textbook, the “most successful and longest-sustained Indian resistance movement in colonial North America was:

A King Philip’s War

B The Pequot War

C The Pueblo Revolt

D Bacon’s Rebellion

Question 8

There was no problem of the “urban poor” in the Colonies prior to the Revolutionary War.

True False
Question 9

The “Regulators” of the Carolinas were:

A Advisers to the colonial governors.

B The official tax-collectors.

C A faction in the British Parliament who believed the colonists were enjoying too much freedom.

D Backcountry farmers rebelling against colonial governments, often over taxes.

Question 10

Slave buyers in the various colonies often preferred to purchase slave from specific African ethnic groups or geographical location.
True
False .

John answers:

According to historians, the central link or “linchpin” of the Atlantic trading system was:

A Sugar
B Tobacco
C European manufactured goods
D The traffic in slaves
C because Great Britain and other countries had many goods and they just wanted money.
Question 7
According to the Norton textbook, the “most successful and longest-sustained Indian resistance movement in colonial North America was:

A King Philip’s War
B The Pequot War
C The Pueblo Revolt
D Bacon’s Rebellion
Um I’m not sure B because the word Pequot is Native American
Question 8
There was no problem of the “urban poor” in the Colonies prior to the Revolutionary War.

True False FALSE
Question 9
The “Regulators” of the Carolinas were:

A Advisers to the colonial governors.
B The official tax-collectors.
C A faction in the British Parliament who believed the colonists were enjoying too much freedom.
D Backcountry farmers rebelling against colonial governments, often over taxes.
D is the only one that makes any sense so D.
Question 10
Slave buyers in the various colonies often preferred to purchase slave from specific African ethnic groups or geographical location.
True
False . False;they just wanted slaves

Sharon asks…

Who still believes Global Warming is caused by man?

Global warming ethics, pork and profits

By Paul Driessen
web posted February 12, 2007

The ink has barely dried on its new code of conduct, and already Congress is redefining ethics and pork to fit a global warming agenda. As Will Rogers observed, “with Congress, every time they make a joke, it’s a law. And every time they make a law, it’s a joke.”

However, life-altering, economy-wrecking climate bills are no laughing matter. That’s why we need to recognize that the Kyoto Protocol and proposed “climate protection” laws will not stabilize the climate, even if CO2 is to blame. It’s why we must acknowledge that money to be made, and power to be gained, from climate alarmism and symbolism is a major reason so many are getting on the climate “consensus” bandwagon.

In accusing ExxonMobil of giving “more than $19 million since the late 1990s” to public policy institutes that promote climate holocaust “denial,” Senate Inquisitors Olympia Snowe and Jay Rockefeller slandered both the donor and recipients. Moreover, this is less than half of what Pew Charitable Trusts and allied foundations contributed to the Pew Center on Climate Change alone over the same period. It’s a pittance compared to what US environmental groups spent propagating climate chaos scare stories.

It amounts to 30 cents for every $1,000 that the US, EU and UN spent since 1993 (some $80 billion all together) on global warming catastrophe research. And it ignores the fact that the Exxon grants also supported malaria control, Third World economic development and many other efforts.

Aside from honest, if unfounded, fears of climate disasters, why might others support climate alarmism?

Scientists who use climate change to explain environmental changes improve their chances of getting research grants from foundations, corporations – and US government programs that budget a whopping $6.5 billion for global warming in 2007. They also increase the likelihood of getting headlines and quotes in news stories: “Climate change threatens extinction of rare frogs, scientist says.” Climate disaster skeptics face an uphill battle on grants, headlines and quotes.

Politicians get to grandstand green credentials, cement relationships with activists who can support reelection campaigns and higher aspirations, magically transform $14-billion in alternative energy pork into ethical planetary protection, and promote policies that otherwise would raise serious eyebrows.

Corporate actions that cause even one death are dealt with severely; but praise is heaped on federal mileage standards that cause hundreds of deaths, as cars are downsized and plasticized to save fuel and reduce emissions. High energy prices are denounced at congressional hearings, if due to market forces – but praised if imposed by government “to prevent climate change.” Drilling in the Arctic or off our coasts is condemned, even to create jobs, tax revenues and enhanced security; but subsidizing wind power to generate 2% of our electricity is lauded, even if giant turbines despoil millions of acres and kill millions of birds.

Alarmist rhetoric has also redefined corporate social responsibility, created the Climate Action Partnership and launched the emerging Enviro-Industrial Complex.

Environmental activists have turned climate fears into successful fund-raising tools – and a brilliant strategy for achieving their dream of controlling global resource use, technological change and economic development, through laws, treaties, regulations and pressure campaigns. Recent developments promise to supercharge these efforts.

Environmental Defense is collaborating with Morgan Stanley, to promote emission trading systems and other climate change initiatives – giving ED direct monetary and policy stakes in the banking, investment and political arenas, and in any carbon allowance or cap-and-trade programs Congress might enact. Other environmental groups, companies and Wall Street firms will no doubt follow their lead.

ED designed and led the disingenuous campaign that persuaded many healthcare agencies to ban DDT, resulting in millions of deaths from malaria. Greenpeace, Sierra Club, Union of Concerned Scientists, ED and other groups still post deceitful claims about DDT on their websites, further delaying progress against this killer disease. By blaming climate change for malaria, they deflect criticism for their vile actions.

Climate catastrophe claims enable activists to gain official advisory status with companies and governments on environmental issues. They also make it “ethical” for Rainforest Action Network and other pressure groups to oppose power generation in Third World countries, where few have access to electricity – and thereby keep communities perpetually impoverished.

Meanwhile, Prince Charles gets lionized for appropriating 62 first class jetliner seats for his entourage of 20, on a trans-Atlantic trip to receive an environmental prize and lecture Americans on saving the Earth – because at least he didn’t use his private jet.

Companies in the CAP and EIC can develop and promote new product lines, using tax breaks, subsidies, legal mandates and regulatory provisions to gain competitive advantages. They get favorable coverage from the media, and kid-glove treatment from members of Congress who routinely pillory climate chaos skeptics.

Some worry that this could become a license to further redefine corporate ethics, present self-interest as planet-saving altruism, and profit from questionable arrangements with environmental groups and Congress. Certainly, cap-and-trade rules will create valuable property rights and reward companies that reduce CO2 emissions, often by replacing old, inefficient, high-polluting plants that they want to retire anyway.

DuPont and BP will get money for biofuels, GE for its portfolio of climate protection equipment, ADM for ethanol, Lehman Brothers for emission trading and other deals. Environmental activists will be able to influence corporate, state and federal policy, and rake in still more cash. Insurance companies can blame global warming for rate increases and coverage denials.

Lobbying and deal-brokering will enter a new era. As Thenardier the innkeeper observed in Les Miserables, “When it comes to fixing prices, there are lots of tricks he knows. Jees, it’s just amazing how it grows.” Indeed, the opportunities to “game the system” will be limited only by one’s “eco-magination.”

To determine the losers, look in the mirror. Activists and politicians are creating a Frankenstein climate monster on steroids. Were it real, we’d need to dismantle our economy and living standards to slay the beast. How else could we eliminate 80–90% of US and EU fossil fuel emissions by 2050, to stabilize carbon dioxide emissions and (theoretically) a climate that has always been anything but stable?

Think lifestyles circa 1900, or earlier. Ponder the British environment minister’s latest prescription: World War II rationing, no meat or cheese, restrictions on air travel, no veggies that aren’t grown locally. France wants a new government agency that would single out, police and penalize countries that “abuse the Earth.” Others want to put little solar panels on African huts, while kleptocratic dictators get millions of dollars for trading away their people’s right to generate electricity and emit CO2.

We should improve energy efficiency, reduce pollution, and develop new energy technologies. But when we demand immediate action to prevent exaggerated or imaginary crises, we stifle debate, railroad through programs that don’t work, create enough pork to fill 50 Chicago stockyards, and impose horrendous unintended consequences on countless families. That is shortsighted and immoral.

John answers:

EVERY CHILDREN OLDER THAN 5YR THAT IS STUDIING SCIENCE AT SCHOOL UNDERSTAND THAT HUMAN ACTIVITY ARE CAUSING Global Warming…

Lisa asks…

Paperbackswap? Free Books?

This website is amazing. Here is the link to register http://rainbowsend.paperbackswap.com/profile/index.php Just click Register on the left hand side of the screen. And below is information on how it works.

List at least 9 or more books in the system to become an active member and receive 3 free credits to get you started trading. List as many books as possible to be more successful in trading.

Browse our online list of books posted by club members, and use your credits to order books.

Selected books are delivered right to your mailbox, for free!

When other members order books that you’ve listed, you mail them from your mailbox and you pay the postage (usually $1.59).

You get one credit (good for one book) for every book you mail when it is received by the club member who requested it.

List as many books as you like. The more books you mail to other members, the more credits you’ll receive.

http://rainbowsend.paperbackswap.com/profile/index.php

John answers:

Authors are in the business of selling books. I wouldnt participate in something like this. If I do have books I want to give away, I send them to guys in Iraq and Afghanastan through Books for Soldiers. They appreciate them and pass them around. As an author I dont mind that because it’s doing a little extra to support the guys and girls over there in very terrible circumstances. For what little it costs to buy paperbacks, I would buy them new and when Im done, I send some of them overseas. I also have people drop off boxes of books to me to send to them. They deserve them. I can afford books and they are easily accessable tome. I mostly buy hardcovers for my library anyway. Pax – C.

Steven asks…

Has Mayor Bloomberg finally revealed what the purpose of forcing global warming down our throats really is?

http://cityroom.blogs.nytimes.com/2008/02/11/bloomberg-urges-un-to-act-on-climate-change/
As a “first precondition” for ensuring success in the upcoming negotiations climate talks in Copenhagen, Denmark, “I believe that the United States, which leads the world in greenhouse-gas production, must finally set real and binding carbon reduction targets,” the mayor said. “As long as there is no penalty or cost in producing greenhouse gases, there will be no incentive to meet such targets. And for that reason, I believe the United States should enact a tax on carbon emissions.”
The mayor reiterated his belief that a cap-and-trade system for reducing emissions would be “less direct and therefore less successful” than a carbon tax, but said that either alternative would be superior to the status quo.
Mr. Bloomberg maintained that a congestion pricing scheme — charging motorists for driving at peak times in the most crowded areas of the city — has worked in cities like London, Stockholm and Singapore and would help New York and other world cities. “Not only will the congestion pricing we proposed reduce the carbon emissions produced by autos, it will also clean our air, make our economy more productive and finance the new transit lines that we desperately need,” he said.

John answers:

Democrats trying to enslave us all?

Global warming is the religion of idiots.

John asks…

My employer has not paid me my wages for the last 5 weeks of my employment. What can I do?

I worked for this company for 3 months as Store Manager. I was paid on a monthly pay system with my first week of pay held in lieu. We received 1 week of notice that the store would be closed. They then missed our final pay date which was to be on the last day of January. Since then they have told us they are waiting on cheques to be paid, have told us the cheques are in the post and when they haven’t shown up tell us that they have not been sent… Each time we phone we are told another story. We have asked to talk to the Owner but they will not give us his details. Two employees have actually received cheques. It is important to state that the company was extremely successful when trading and is not going into administration…
What are my options? What can I do to get my pay? Can I ask them to cover any late bank fees?
I am in the process of contacting Citizens Advice.
p.s This is a UK company.
I did the store accounts – so I have a fair idea of the money they have to play with.

Thank you for your help!

I am aware of ACAS and they are my next port of call – will they represent individual employees and will this cost us money?

John answers:

Contact ACAS (google them) and they will help you get the money back. I know it’s said that you can’t take an employer to a tribunal until you’ve been employed for a year, but I’m fairly certain that this does not apply to unpaid wages claims.

This should get sorted out in a matter of a couple of weeks, but it’s unlikely that you will be able to claim for bank charges and so on.

FYI you should not state that the employer was “extremely successful” because you wouldn’t know! This is what all employers would like their employees to think. Besides, if you’re owed money then you’re owed money, why does it matter how successful they are?

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