Your Questions About Successful Trading Stories

Mandy asks…

Can you check out my CV and give me advice on how to improve it?

I’m looking for a role in HR/ Admin.. My contract is finishing in January, so need to start looking for a new job. Please help! My CV has to be on point!
Msg me at missbig85@yahoo.co.uk

PROFILE
I’m an adaptable and very conscientious individual with experience in a wide range of areas, including customer service, retail, administration and Finance. I have excellent communication skills combined with the ability to relate well to people at all levels. I am now seeking a challenging and rewarding opportunity within a successful organization to build my career.

SKILLS & QUALITIES
•Ehnthusiastic and self-motivated
•Very Charming
•Excellent Customer Service
•Patient and diplomatic
•Problem-solver
•Show initiative
•Flexible
•Quick learner
I have excellent computer skills and I have every confidence and excellent proficiency in all aspects of Microsoft Office. I am a highly motivated person with a strong desire to learn all skills and tasks involved in any position that may be offered to me.

WORK EXPERIENCE
The Open University HQ- Walton Hall Milton Keynes- Financial Support Officer September 2010 – January 2011 (Temporary staff with Randstad Recruitment agency)
•Carrying out income- based assessments, to consider whether a student is eligible to receive financial support or not
•Checking student’s financial support applications to make sure they were filled in correctly.
•Writing letters to students to keep them updated on the progress of their application.
•Liase with other Universities and Student Finance with regards to student’s applying to the OU.
•Regular use of VOICE data entry system, CIRCE and MS office.
•Ensuring confidential student information remained protected.
•Carried out general administrative tasks
•General Admin.
Santander – C. Milton Keynes, Tele- relations Advisor- March 2009- September 2009
?Answering customer questions and helping them make choices
?Transferring customers to specialists in the relevant departments
?Dealing with customer credit card/ debit card issues
?Dealing with customer account security
?Taking steps to prevent fraud
?Keeping calm and professional whilst maintaining positive attitude
?Worked together in a team in order to achieve set targets

HSB Trading – Bletchley Milton Keynes, Receptionist/ Admin assistant October 2007-November 2008
?Met and greeted visitors
?Managed high volume phone calls
?Assisted Managers with administrative tasks as requested
?Ensuring confidential customer information remained protected
?Regularly used Microsoft office programmes to complete set tasks

EDUCATION AND QUALIFICATIONS

?Sept 2001- 2005: St Paul’s RC school, Milton Keynes: Achieved GCSE’s in English Literature. (C) Religious studies (B), English language (C) and science (D, D).

?Sept 2006- June 2007: Milton Keynes College: BTEC in business first diploma (Merit)

?Sept 2007- June 2008: Milton Keynes College: BTEC in business National Certificate (Double Distinction), Key skills application of number portfolio (Pass)

?Sept 2009- June 2010: London South Bank University: Bsc Adult Nursing (discontinued course)

INTERESTS
I enjoy going out and meeting new people. Reading is one of my many passions, and I often write short stories of my own online as a hobby. I love music, especially Jazz, and often attend live musical concerts.

REFERENCES AVAILABLE ON REQUEST

John answers:

It seems ok to me, but watch your tenses when writing – you list things in 2 different tenses ie: “ensuring” then “carried out”. Later you say “assisted” followed by “ensuring”.Stick to one tense and say ensuring and carrying out, assisting and ensuring.

Charles asks…

Economics Professor says Obama’s plan will further hurt the US, thoughts?

Obamanomics Is a Recipe for Recession
By MICHAEL J. BOSKIN WSJ
October 16, 2008

What if I told you that a prominent global political figure in recent months has proposed: abrogating key features of his government’s contracts with energy companies; unilaterally renegotiating his country’s international economic treaties; dramatically raising marginal tax rates on the “rich” to levels not seen in his country in three decades (which would make them among the highest in the world); and changing his country’s social insurance system into explicit welfare by severing the link between taxes and benefits?

AP
The first name that came to mind would probably not be Barack Obama, possibly our nation’s next president. Yet despite his obvious general intelligence, and uplifting and motivational eloquence, Sen. Obama reveals this startling economic illiteracy in his policy proposals and economic pronouncements. From the property rights and rule of (contract) law foundations of a successful market economy to the specifics of tax, spending, energy, regulatory and trade policy, if the proposals espoused by candidate Obama ever became law, the American economy would suffer a serious setback.

To be sure, Mr. Obama has been clouding these positions as he heads into the general election and, once elected, presidents sometimes see the world differently than when they are running. Some cite Bill Clinton’s move to the economic policy center following his Hillary health-care and 1994 Congressional election debacles as a possible Obama model. But candidate Obama starts much further left on spending, taxes, trade and regulation than candidate Clinton. A move as large as Mr. Clinton’s toward the center would still leave Mr. Obama on the economic left.

Also, by 1995 the country had a Republican Congress to limit President Clinton’s big government agenda, whereas most political pundits predict strengthened Democratic majorities in both Houses in 2009. Because newly elected presidents usually try to implement the policies they campaigned on, Mr. Obama’s proposals are worth exploring in some depth. I’ll discuss taxes and trade, although the story on his other proposals is similar.

First, taxes. The table nearby demonstrates what could happen to marginal tax rates in an Obama administration. Mr. Obama would raise the top marginal rates on earnings, dividends and capital gains passed in 2001 and 2003, and phase out itemized deductions for high income taxpayers. He would uncap Social Security taxes, which currently are levied on the first $102,000 of earnings. The result is a remarkable reduction in work incentives for our most economically productive citizens.

The top 35% marginal income tax rate rises to 39.6%; adding the state income tax, the Medicare tax, the effect of the deduction phase-out and Mr. Obama’s new Social Security tax (of up to 12.4%) increases the total combined marginal tax rate on additional labor earnings (or small business income) from 44.6% to a whopping 62.8%. People respond to what they get to keep after tax, which the Obama plan reduces from 55.4 cents on the dollar to 37.2 cents — a reduction of one-third in the after-tax wage!

Despite the rhetoric, that’s not just on “rich” individuals. It’s also on a lot of small businesses and two-earner middle-aged middle-class couples in their peak earnings years in high cost-of-living areas. (His large increase in energy taxes, not documented here, would disproportionately harm low-income Americans. And, while he says he will not raise taxes on the middle class, he’ll need many more tax hikes to pay for his big increase in spending.)

On dividends the story is about as bad, with rates rising from 50.4% to 65.6%, and after-tax returns falling over 30%. Even a small response of work and investment to these lower returns means such tax rates, sooner or later, would seriously damage the economy.

On economic policy, the president proposes and Congress disposes, so presidents often wind up getting the favorite policy of powerful senators or congressmen. Thus, while Mr. Obama also proposes an alternative minimum tax (AMT) patch, he could instead wind up with the permanent abolition plan for the AMT proposed by the Ways and Means Committee Chairman Charlie Rangel (D., N.Y.) — a 4.6% additional hike in the marginal rate with no deductibility of state income taxes. Marginal tax rates would then approach 70%, levels not seen since the 1970s and among the highest in the world. The after-tax return to work — the take-home wage for more time or effort — would be cut by more than 40%.

Now trade. In the primaries, Sen. Obama was famously protectionist, claiming he would rip up and renegotiate the North American Free Trade Agreement (Nafta). Since its passage (for which former President Bill Clinton ran a brave anchor leg, given opposition to trade liberalization in his party), Nafta has risen to almost mythological proportions as a metaphor for

John answers:

We really do not need a professional to tell us that. It’s pretty obvious that Obama’s plan would hurt the economy more than help it. People that don’t see it that way aren’t seeing clearly.

Jenny asks…

Standford Professor of Economics says Obama’s plan will hurt us, thoughts?

Obamanomics Is a Recipe for Recession
By MICHAEL J. BOSKIN WSJ
October 16th, 2008

What if I told you that a prominent global political figure in recent months has proposed: abrogating key features of his government’s contracts with energy companies; unilaterally renegotiating his country’s international economic treaties; dramatically raising marginal tax rates on the “rich” to levels not seen in his country in three decades (which would make them among the highest in the world); and changing his country’s social insurance system into explicit welfare by severing the link between taxes and benefits?

AP
The first name that came to mind would probably not be Barack Obama, possibly our nation’s next president. Yet despite his obvious general intelligence, and uplifting and motivational eloquence, Sen. Obama reveals this startling economic illiteracy in his policy proposals and economic pronouncements. From the property rights and rule of (contract) law foundations of a successful market economy to the specifics of tax, spending, energy, regulatory and trade policy, if the proposals espoused by candidate Obama ever became law, the American economy would suffer a serious setback.

To be sure, Mr. Obama has been clouding these positions as he heads into the general election and, once elected, presidents sometimes see the world differently than when they are running. Some cite Bill Clinton’s move to the economic policy center following his Hillary health-care and 1994 Congressional election debacles as a possible Obama model. But candidate Obama starts much further left on spending, taxes, trade and regulation than candidate Clinton. A move as large as Mr. Clinton’s toward the center would still leave Mr. Obama on the economic left.

Also, by 1995 the country had a Republican Congress to limit President Clinton’s big government agenda, whereas most political pundits predict strengthened Democratic majorities in both Houses in 2009. Because newly elected presidents usually try to implement the policies they campaigned on, Mr. Obama’s proposals are worth exploring in some depth. I’ll discuss taxes and trade, although the story on his other proposals is similar.

First, taxes. The table nearby demonstrates what could happen to marginal tax rates in an Obama administration. Mr. Obama would raise the top marginal rates on earnings, dividends and capital gains passed in 2001 and 2003, and phase out itemized deductions for high income taxpayers. He would uncap Social Security taxes, which currently are levied on the first $102,000 of earnings. The result is a remarkable reduction in work incentives for our most economically productive citizens.

The top 35% marginal income tax rate rises to 39.6%; adding the state income tax, the Medicare tax, the effect of the deduction phase-out and Mr. Obama’s new Social Security tax (of up to 12.4%) increases the total combined marginal tax rate on additional labor earnings (or small business income) from 44.6% to a whopping 62.8%. People respond to what they get to keep after tax, which the Obama plan reduces from 55.4 cents on the dollar to 37.2 cents — a reduction of one-third in the after-tax wage!

Despite the rhetoric, that’s not just on “rich” individuals. It’s also on a lot of small businesses and two-earner middle-aged middle-class couples in their peak earnings years in high cost-of-living areas. (His large increase in energy taxes, not documented here, would disproportionately harm low-income Americans. And, while he says he will not raise taxes on the middle class, he’ll need many more tax hikes to pay for his big increase in spending.)

On dividends the story is about as bad, with rates rising from 50.4% to 65.6%, and after-tax returns falling over 30%. Even a small response of work and investment to these lower returns means such tax rates, sooner or later, would seriously damage the economy.

On economic policy, the president proposes and Congress disposes, so presidents often wind up getting the favorite policy of powerful senators or congressmen. Thus, while Mr. Obama also proposes an alternative minimum tax (AMT) patch, he could instead wind up with the permanent abolition plan for the AMT proposed by the Ways and Means Committee Chairman Charlie Rangel (D., N.Y.) — a 4.6% additional hike in the marginal rate with no deductibility of state income taxes. Marginal tax rates would then approach 70%, levels not seen since the 1970s and among the highest in the world. The after-tax return to work — the take-home wage for more time or effort — would be cut by more than 40%.

Now trade. In the primaries, Sen. Obama was famously protectionist, claiming he would rip up and renegotiate the North American Free Trade Agreement (Nafta). Since its passage (for which former President Bill Clinton ran a brave anchor leg, given opposition to trade liberalization in his party), Nafta has risen to almost mythological proportions as a metaphor f

John answers:

This comes to no surprise at all. None, and I have to repeat that none of our elected officials have NO true knowledge of “economic planning”. We’d be fools to think that either one of these guys could help bring stability to the “market”.

While I am going to vote for Obama, I by no means even listen to him, or any of our officials when it comes to “economics” amongst some other things. Most people aren’t voting for Obama, because of his “plan”…it’s only a plan, and he didn’t even write it. He was only a “pawn” while his “advisers” did all of the numbering…heck, I’m sure he only understands about %10 of his or anybody else’ “eco-plan”.

Susan asks…

Why do people hate vocational schools and more.?

I’m a freshman at a vocational school. Me and a handful of friends went, everyone else from my town either absolutely hated the voc. school or their parents thought vocational schools are bad and we wouldn’t be successful or some other reason. They say we can’t go to college but couldn’t I go to college for my trade? Me and my friends can be successful right? The reason I went was so I could possibly be a electrician and be very successful in my trade. I know in our engineering trade people have graduated and went to some college in Florida near the Kennedy space station and became aerospace engineers but Is going to a vocational a good choice? If I was planning on being a electrician do I want to be at a vocational school or the town high school? Do I have equal chances of getting into any college that a student at a town high school would? And really why do people hate vocational schools/ Is it a good choice to go? and I DONT want a 3 sentence explanation about your 2nd cousin that graduated, didnt go to college and is a drug dealer. Please I want a good explanation and not a story about your girlfriend/boyfriend who went and works minimum wage ect.

John answers:

The people who hate vocational schools don’t necessarily understand them.

Vocational schools are designed to target all learning towards the career path you are planning.

Vocational schools are excellent for tradespeople because they have more courses and subjects that are adaptable to apprenticeships and the part-time employed.

It sounds like you are well on your way to being successful.

George asks…

I’ve forgotten a book title and author.?

The book was probably written in about 2003. I believe the author was a man from the midwest, who was having a reasonably successful career.

The story was set in a small town. Some key points include a woman and a child, another man and his daughter (who was becoming hard to handle) and a town square where gossip took place. It was a very straightforward piece of Americana. At one point the woman sat next to the man while he was bathing – there was sexual tension there. Also this man – or someone – threw something threw the church’s stained glass window. This had to do with him working in the stained glass trade. There was also references to the woman’s child’s father and his drinking. I think he also got knocked out and robbed at one point and he knew who it was that did it.

The man and his daughter skip town at the end of the book. He was trying to reconnect with her before she got too wild. There was a ne’er do well boyfriend maybe. I think the man was a widower.

John answers:

Post this question at www.whatsthatbook.com. I hope someone there will remember this book.

Powered by Yahoo! Answers

This entry was posted in Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink.