Your Questions About Paper Trading Futures

Mary asks…

Where is the best resource to learn the basics of stock and options trading?

Including lingo, what options are and how they differ from stocks, short sales, day trading, etc.

John answers:

The Wall Street Journal (used to?) publish the Guide to Money & Markets with a paid subscription, a free site is Investopedia.com University 101, I’ve referred my friends to this site since the sections are short enough that you can figure out quickly if you already know this part and can move on to the next one.

Http://www.investopedia.com/university/?viewed=1

One of the common challenges of investor and trader education is since we are the most well informed group of consumers than anyone else in the world, most investor education tools are half boring and rehash. The Idiots Guides are a fine series of publications but these aren’t excempt from rehashing what we already know.

The Investopedia site is very similar to the WSJ Guides which were being published before the web even existed and were equally modular and concise.

Investopedia also has one of the largest online contextual dictionaries of financial terms when you’re curious and becoming comfortable with exploring strategies.

I would also suggest you begin trading in a practice or demo account, this is also called “paper trading” where you can take positions with a fantasy dollar amount and those positions will fluctuate in value and in accordance with real world market conditions.

A demo account is one of the best tools to help you determine your risk acceptance and volatility tolerance, but it is still never the same as the real thing.
Some new traders are reluctant to explore demo accounts with the perspective they are childs toys or less than courageous, this is dangerous since “hero trading” results in poverty and many professionals today still use demo accounts or demo transactions to help assess the viability of new and modified strategies.

PFG offers an excellent demo account at no charge and one you can trade all kinds of instruments including options and futures.

Http://www.pfgca.com/besttest.htm

Marketwatch.com also offers Virtual Stock Exchange at vse.marketwatch.com but it is less than satisfactory in my own experiences since it only allows the purchasing and short selling of stocks and the orders can take hours to reflect in your virtual account and impact your virtual cash balance.

Chris asks…

Where is the best resource to learn the basics of stock and options trading?

Including lingo, what options are and how they differ from stocks, short sales, day trading, etc.

John answers:

The Wall Street Journal (used to?) publish the Guide to Money & Markets with a paid subscription, a free site is Investopedia.com University 101, I’ve referred my friends to this site since the sections are short enough that you can figure out quickly if you already know this part and can move on to the next one.

Http://www.investopedia.com/university/?viewed=1

One of the common challenges of investor and trader education is since we are the most well informed group of consumers than anyone else in the world, most investor education tools are half boring and rehash. The Idiots Guides are a fine series of publications but these aren’t excempt from rehashing what we already know.

The Investopedia site is very similar to the WSJ Guides which were being published before the web even existed and were equally modular and concise.

Investopedia also has one of the largest online contextual dictionaries of financial terms when you’re curious and becoming comfortable with exploring strategies.

I would also suggest you begin trading in a practice or demo account, this is also called “paper trading” where you can take positions with a fantasy dollar amount and those positions will fluctuate in value and in accordance with real world market conditions.

A demo account is one of the best tools to help you determine your risk acceptance and volatility tolerance, but it is still never the same as the real thing.
Some new traders are reluctant to explore demo accounts with the perspective they are childs toys or less than courageous, this is dangerous since “hero trading” results in poverty and many professionals today still use demo accounts or demo transactions to help assess the viability of new and modified strategies.

PFG offers an excellent demo account at no charge and one you can trade all kinds of instruments including options and futures.

Http://www.pfgca.com/besttest.htm

Marketwatch.com also offers Virtual Stock Exchange at vse.marketwatch.com but it is less than satisfactory in my own experiences since it only allows the purchasing and short selling of stocks and the orders can take hours to reflect in your virtual account and impact your virtual cash balance.

Ruth asks…

What exactly is a Trade show and what type of vendors participate?

Im new to all this business thing and to be honest I dont know where to start! I have a product line Id like to get going (gift/home decor type products marketed towards women) and I have all these ideas and designs that Ive done for the products, but I don’t know whats the next step? my ideal destiny for my “brand” would be for them to be sold at retail stores nationwide(gift shops/dept stores/etc). Anyways, I heard about setting up a booth at a trade show, but what exactly is a trade show? Would I have to have these products already manufactured? Would the attendees want to place orders right then and there? Or would they only get information for future reference? I only have these ideas and concept designs, I would need to have someone make them professionally, I would assume I would at least have to have a sample product? Well any information would help, thanks to all!

John answers:

Every trade show has a theme, can be construction, about home decors, or paper products , cars, concept cars etc. But for your product line, mostly you should be ready to manufacture, and those displayed should be what it should really be. You have to be ready with lots of collaterals and brochures, name cards, have a knowledgeable stafff to answer queries, a legit business, and a permanent contact address.

Most attendees would get your brochures for future reference, and some will place orders on the spot.

Helen asks…

What do I have to do to get out of financing a vehicle?

I just simply can’t afford this car — I would like to possibly trade it for an older vehicle but don’t even know if I can do that.
Any suggestions… Is there anything I can do?
Or should I just go directly to the source (financing company or dealer) to find out what I can do?

John answers:

If you have already taken delivery of the car and signed the retail installment contract (that un-readable long paper work) then you are going to have a really hard time getting out of this car and the financing.

Unfortunately because the lenders thought that you were able to afford it and you agreed to it at the time you are required to fulfill your side of the contract. The only thing that you could possibly do is sell the car on your own and if you are upside down you will have to shell out the difference and pay the car off. This will not look good on your credit because the open account having such a short time being open will look bad to future lenders.

Good luck!

Laura asks…

What are some Political reasons why imperialism (expanding) is a bad idea?

I have to do a paper on anti imperialism and my topic is political reasons why expanding is not a good idea. Can someone help me please?

John answers:

The major disadvantage, is more often than not, at a future time, it creates serious consequences for the aggressor nation.

Political imperialism is done many different ways. In the 20th century, it was generally through colonization where the imperialist took control of a weaker nation, and directly controlled the local government. Later, most imperialism was accomplished by overthrowing governments, through assassinations or financing revolutions, then placing politicians from that country who was sympathetic and loyal to you, as a “puppet” dictator. Today, most imperialism is done financially through trade agreements, embargo, blockades, currency manipulation, and tariffs.

Much of the problem the U.S. And Britain face today, is the animosity created years ago by British colonization, and later puppet governments in Iran and Iraq, the U.S. Was responsible for installing. Saddam Hussein and the Shah of Iran were leaders the U.S. Prompted up. Soviet Georgia was an example of Russian imperialism that has came back to haunt them.

Another disadvantage, is when you take control of a foreign nation through whatever means, especially through imperialism, you take fiscal and moral responsibility for those people. It’s sort of like adopting a child. You are morally and fiscal held responsible for their well being and treatment by the rest of the world, and by history. You will at some point be held accountable.

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