Your Questions About Paper Trading Free

Paul asks…

How to get started on the stock market?

All help and information would be much appreciated, basically I want to start small, I am very good with numbers but not so good with words so please in the simplest form can you give me some info and direction of how to start trading 🙂

Which companies to trade through.

When companies have a fee per trade, what does this mean.

I have good buisness and mathematic understanding I just need help taking the first steps..! Thanks

John answers:

Before you spend $0.01 on any investment or even selecting a brokerage firmn, you must know what you’re doing, why you’re doing it and how to do it. Before you invest in any security, the first investment you should make is in yourself, and the best investment you can make is by educating yourself.

Begin your education by learning why you should invest and the importance of being able to make your own decisions or how the pro’s make theirs. Start your education by reading “Investing or Dummies” by Eric Tyson.
To continue your education select some of the following
Beating the Street by Peter Lynch
Bulls Make Money, Bears Make Money, Pigs Get Slaughtered, by Gallea
How to Make Money in Stocks” by William O’Neil
24 Essential Lessons for Investment Success by William O’Neil
The Intelligent Investor, by Benjamin Graham
Common Stocks, Uncommon Profits, by Philip A. Fisher
One Up on Wall Street by Peter Lynch
Stocks for the Long Run, by Jeremy Siegel
The Interpretation of Financial Statements by Benjamin Graham
The Lazy Person’s Guide to Investing by Paul B. Farrell
The Warren Buffett Way by Robert Hagstrom
Trading for a Living, by Alexander Elder
Uncover the Secret Hiding Places of Stock Market Profits by Joel Greenblatt.
What Works on Wall Street by James O’Shaunessey
You Can Be a Stock Market Genius by Joel Greenblatt
Your Money and Your Brain by Jason Zweig

Websites that can provide instructions and help with procedures and terminology are Investopedia – http://www.investopedia.com/ http://www.investorshub.com/ and 1 Source for Stocks – http://www.1source4stocks.com/info/stock-analyst-opinion.asp or Smart Money
http://www.smartmoney.com/
Visit some of the more professional websites like Zacks Research – http://www.zacks.com/ Schaeffer’s http://www.schaeffersresearch.com/ Investors Business Daily – http://www.investors.com/default.htm?fromad=1
Some of these web sites will have advertisers who are worth looking into also. And remember, if they offer free information, get it.

And when you think you want to invest/trade, try some paper trading to test your skills without spending you money http://simulatorinvestopedia.com/ http://www.moneyworks4me.com/
and/or http://www.tradingsimulation.com/

You at least have made the right decision to start investing, this is the first big step and it won’t be your last. Keep taking those steps forward and along the way never take the advice from people that are not in the market or try to tell you not to invest.

Good luck on journey, study hard and you’ll invest well

George asks…

What does finding a star on the wrapper of a Tootsie Pop mean?

When I was a kid, I believed that if you got the Tootsie Pop wrapper with an Indian shooting a star from his bow on it you could the wrapper to the store where you bought the Tootsie Pop and you would get a free Tootsie Pop. Has anyone tried it? Has anyone else heard of this?

John answers:

Someone else asked this question a couple weeks ago and I gave them the same information that I am about to give you.

*Tootsie Roll Pops traditionally were wrapped in paper with icons and symbols, including but not limited to, an American Indian with a bow and arrow aimed at a star. From soon after the introduction of Tootsie Pops from 1931 through the present day (currently generating about 150 letters a week), a rumor has circulated that a wrapper containing the American Indian icon shooting a star could be traded-in for a free Tootsie Roll Pop.

According to Tootsie Roll Industries and web site Snopes.com[2], this rumor is not true. However, according to Snopes.com[3], individual merchants have chosen to honor the wrapper legend over the years, allowing people to “win” a free pop or pops.

With the innovation and spread of the Internet and e-mail, many queries to Tootsie Roll Industries are in the form of email. Below is the company’s response, dated March 24, 2005, to one such query:

Thank you for your interest in our Tootsie Pop wrappers. We are pleased to have an opportunity to tell the true story about our Tootsie Pop wrappers.
Many years ago, a rumor surfaced that said if the wrapper of a Tootsie Pop with a star was found and returned to the company, a free Tootsie Pop, or any number of things would be sent to the lucky person. We truly don’t know why or where this rumor started, as our records do not indicate that our company ever sponsored any type of promotion surrounding images on the wrapper.
We hope we have been able to clarify this matter for you and we thank you for contacting us.

Susan asks…

What are the economic causes of the civil war?

I have to write a 5 page research paper on the economic causes of the civil war. I have already written about cotton, industrialization, and railroads. HELP!!!!!!!

John answers:

The root economic cause and root cause of the War Between the States was over tariffs. The North, controlling the House of Representatives, managed to control the tariff laws which put duties on imported manufactured goods (particularly from England and France) at the expense of the South.
The trade of cotton to Europe led to a natural recipical trade in manufactured goods. Northern Industry wanted protection by way of tariffs and got it, beginning shortly after the War of 1812.
Henry Clay is considered to be the father of the “American System” which favored northern industry at the expense of the South. Tariffs were adjusted on a regular basis from then on, always in favor of the North at the expense of the South.
The flash point of the War Between the States could very well have been in 1832 with what the South called “The Tariff of Abonimation”. (The 1828 Tariff Act) Jackson’s Vice President, John C. Calhoun resigned and went back to South Carolina to rally forces which would nullifiy federal legislation.
Secession was barely avoided at that time, by the North coming to its senses and backing off on the tariffs. The issue remained a thorn in the side of Southerners and was the major cause of the 1861 Secession.
Southern poliitical leaders knew they were losing control of Congress due to the immigration into the Northern States and westward movement. Control in the Senate could only be assured with the admission of a slave state in conjunction with a free state (Missouri Compromise of 1820).
Since the Yankees won the War, they wrote the history and have centered the question on slavery whereas it is economics which is the bottom line.
The South felt it was being unfairly taxed and forced to subsidize Northern industry and such tariffs distrupted the South’s natural trading partners in Europe.
Hope this helps and sorry I need to turn the spell check off as it is too annoying.

Maria asks…

If paperwork is destroyed in a fraud case do the crooks go free?

When the World Trade Towers exploded on 9-11 it destroyed the SEC headquarters where they were handling the Enron and World Com scandal but because the paperwork was destroyed all charges were dropped. Is that common that as long as the crook gets their hands on their paperwork and destroys it then the other party can’t sue them or hold them accountable?

John answers:

By 2001, many law enforcement operations, insurance companies, banks, courts, etc., had digitized much of their records. Electronic records are duplicated and stored in separate places to reduce risks of loss in case of fire, flood, tornado, etc.

Additionally, there are other ways courts may replicate information when original paper documents are destroyed.

These losses may slow prosecutions and lawsuits, but they rarely stop them.

Donna asks…

What would have happened if the Jamestown colony failed in America?

Its a histroy / civics question on this paper that im not sure about and need help on.. all answered appreciated.

John answers:

Look. If jamestown failed, another would’ve taken its place. Maybe not right away but soon. These early settlements were backed by private funds so as soon as it was established and turning a buck, good. Many of these settlements were started and few if any were govt funded so free enterprise ruled, sanctioned by the prevailing govt (in this case england). Govt made $$$ too by way of taxes and trading so it was in their interest as well that success was evident.

Keep in mind that new england and its early establishments made it possible to empty out england’s debtors prisons. These poor souls worked off their debts in the early colonies. When that enterprise ended, slavery was introduced. People got too use to having workers for little or no wages.

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