Your Questions About Paper Trading Free

Sandra asks…

Did Communism ever exist besides on paper?

I’ve been reading a lot of biographies lately, and one of the things I’ve noticed about Communist countries is that there has always been some form of free market Capitalism.

In Cuba they call their unconventional trade practices “Socialismo,” and even North Korea has de facto mercantilism practice that consists of bribery and small scale trade.

The Soviet Union never quite perfected the “socialist utopia” either, based on the accounts I’ve read about day to day life.

So has Communism ever existed except on paper? It just seems like it would be physically impossible to truly implement. It just runs contrary to human nature.

John answers:

There are some religious groups which operate on a communal system, but event that is within the free market system. You may want to read about (or if a colony is nearby visit) the Hutterites – Hutterian Brethren which came into being thanks to Jakob Hutter, of Europe – German regions.

Marx claims to have built his concept of communism on communalism as practised by primitive cultures. Much of that history relied on assumptions and a utopian view of tribes and clans living under subsistence conditions. It also relied on a surplus of goods/products/services at all times which does not always happen.

There are stories of ‘communes’ (such as that of Paris) during the French Revolution (which occurred before Karl Marx began to write), but little is recorded – likely because people were working hard at staying alive and clear of the guillotine blade.

If you want to dig for evidence, consider the writings of Cultural/Social Anthropologists.

Ruth asks…

How do you make a technical drawing with pen and paper?

Technical drawings are made on the computer with CAD, Computer-Aided-Design. How can you make a technical drawing with pen and paper?

John answers:

The process is not as different as you’d think. Some disciplines – like industrial design – still start with hand drawings.

The tools of the trade are a draftsman’s table, t-square, triangle, templates, pencils, vellum or a plastic material whose name escapes me at the moment, and the most important tools of all: eraser and shield.

In my hand-draw era (1979 ~ 1987) these drawings were “digitized”, in my case entered as net lists for PC board design, by a CAD operator. Of course there was a tedious cross-check process of verifying the drawing vs. The nelist vs. The layout. Seems dumb today but that’s how things were done.

There’s free or very cheap tools now for just about any kind of technical drawing. For mechanical and architectural stuff try Google Sketchup.

Helen asks…

What was the ideologies of English Merchants during the early 19th century?

What was the ideologies of English Merchants during the early 19th century? i have to write a two page paper on it and i have no idea. Can you care to explain a little too? thank you very much :]

John answers:

Free trade or classical economic liberalism (not what you think) a la Adam Smith.

They probably want you to contrast that position with the mercantilism of the previous period.

Read your assigned texts. It’s all in there.

Mary asks…

How do you send canvases/sketch pads in the mail?

I am currently trading sticker designs,canvases,sketchbooks, and marker packs through the mail but I don’t know how to send the bigger things like canvases. How would I do it and what would be the cheapest way?? Thanks!

John answers:

I recommend putting the painting in a frame. If the size of the painting is thick, you can buy a shadow box frame, floater frame, or a frame with a deep profile. If you do not want to use a frame, then maybe you can put the painting in an acid-free bag or wrap it with acid-free paper.

Go to ULINE website to buy shipping supplies or to request a catalog.

Search the following words on Uline website to find shipping supplies for artwork:

1) PROTECT 4 CORNERS OF THE ARTWORK:
corrugated corner protectors
bubble corner guards
foam frame protectors

2) PLACE ARTWORK IN ACID-FREE BAG TO PROTECT AGAINST WATER/RAIN:
uline 6 mil poly bags
uline 6 mil reclosable bags

3) WRAP UP ARTWORK FOR MORE PROTECTION:
bubble wrap
acid free paper
glassine paper

4) USE TAPE WHEN WRAPPING ARTWORK:
acid free tape

5) USE 2 THICK PADS SO ARTWORK WON’T BEND, PLACE PAD IN FRONT AND BACK OF ARTWORK:
corrugated pads

6) PUT ARTWORK IN A SHIPPING BOX:
artwork shippers
artwork/mirror boxes
multi depth boxes

7) PUT LABEL ON THE OUTSIDE OF SHIPPING BOX:
do not bend labels
fragile shipping labels

Steven asks…

How did the Meiji Restoration cause the technological modernization in Japan?

i’m doing a research paper for History . i need three “arguments” (causes) on how the Meiji Restoration caused the technological modernization in Japan. I’ve been looking in books and on databases for days but i cant seem to really understand it how it caused the technological modernization.
all help is very much appreciated.

John answers:

Well, it seems that during preceding Edo era Japanese leaders fell behind technologically compared to the West (who had freer policies allowing for industrialization and economic progress).
So Japan too had to abandon their strict regulations of international trade, abandon the law of seclusion with death penalty for non-compliance; abandon hierarchical structure of society with samurai and nobility on top constantly borrowing from merchant class and increasing taxes to return the debt. So in Meiji era Japanese leaders allowed international trade, commerce, studies abroad in the West spurring innovations, so industrialization became possible in Japan too.

Also Japan abandoned its nobility hiring warring samurai power structure. What they implemented looked “united” and more productive during Meiji era for a while, because local small samurai battles were mercilessly suppressed centrally. But the new centralized societal structure of family registration (with vertical paternal domination enforced by the the law), and mandatory conscription eventually led to even bigger disaster –> ww2… But that’s a whole another story…

Best of luck with your research paper!

Http://www.japanmylove.com/history-of-japan.html

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