Your Questions About Paper Trading Free

Mandy asks…

Why is Chrysler sitting at the free money trough with Ford and GM?

Ford and GM are publicly traded companies and their stock is subject to impact average Americans and their retirement plans. I don’t agree with a bail out, but I see why they are at the table begging. I can’t believe no Senator or Representative in either of these trips to Washington asked Chrysler why they were there also. They are a private firm held by a private company that has plenty of money. If they need money shouldn’t they just ask the parent company for it? Are we really going to give a few billion dollars to a hand full of guys that already have a few billion dollars in the bank?

John answers:

From the Wall Street Journal:

Lawmakers last week questioned Chrysler Chief Executive Robert Nardelli on Cerberus’s commitment to the company. In one exchange with Mr. Nardelli, Sen. Robert Corker (R., Tenn.) criticized the firm. “Cerberus has cash, lots of cash, that it is unwilling to put into this company,” Sen. Corker said.

I’m not sure if Senator Corker was the only one to actually ask the question (I was at work, and am relying on media reports), but plenty of others are objecting to Chrysler getting money. In fact, it’s bipartisan opposition:

If the Senate fails to pass a measure to aid the industry, the House will not act.

That would be fine with Rep. Steve Kagen, D-Appleton. He opposes providing money to Chrysler, which is owned by Cerberus Capital Management LP.

Admittedly, Rep. Kagen’s opposition sounds personal: Another of Cerberus’ companies closed paper mills in his district, but refuses to sell the facilities to investors who want to have a go at running them. But he’s urged other Members of Congress not to give Chrysler any money at all.

It looks like there are Congresscritters who support giving GM and Ford help that object to giving Chrysler help. Whether they’re enough to change the outcome remains to be seen.

Charles asks…

Why is Chrysler sitting at the free money trough with Ford and GM?

Ford and GM are publicly traded companies and their stock is subject to impact average Americans and their retirement plans. I don’t agree with a bail out, but I see why they are at the table begging. I can’t believe no Senator or Representative in either of these trips to Washington asked Chrysler why they were there also. They are a private firm held by a private company that has plenty of money. If they need money shouldn’t they just ask the parent company for it? Are we really going to give a few billion dollars to a hand full of guys that already have a few billion dollars in the bank?

John answers:

From the Wall Street Journal:

Lawmakers last week questioned Chrysler Chief Executive Robert Nardelli on Cerberus’s commitment to the company. In one exchange with Mr. Nardelli, Sen. Robert Corker (R., Tenn.) criticized the firm. “Cerberus has cash, lots of cash, that it is unwilling to put into this company,” Sen. Corker said.

I’m not sure if Senator Corker was the only one to actually ask the question (I was at work, and am relying on media reports), but plenty of others are objecting to Chrysler getting money. In fact, it’s bipartisan opposition:

If the Senate fails to pass a measure to aid the industry, the House will not act.

That would be fine with Rep. Steve Kagen, D-Appleton. He opposes providing money to Chrysler, which is owned by Cerberus Capital Management LP.

Admittedly, Rep. Kagen’s opposition sounds personal: Another of Cerberus’ companies closed paper mills in his district, but refuses to sell the facilities to investors who want to have a go at running them. But he’s urged other Members of Congress not to give Chrysler any money at all.

It looks like there are Congresscritters who support giving GM and Ford help that object to giving Chrysler help. Whether they’re enough to change the outcome remains to be seen.

Daniel asks…

Why is Chrysler sitting at the free money trough with Ford and GM?

Ford and GM are publicly traded companies and their stock is subject to impact average Americans and their retirement plans. I don’t agree with a bail out, but I see why they are at the table begging. I can’t believe no Senator or Representative in either of these trips to Washington asked Chrysler why they were there also. They are a private firm held by a private company that has plenty of money. If they need money shouldn’t they just ask the parent company for it? Are we really going to give a few billion dollars to a hand full of guys that already have a few billion dollars in the bank?

John answers:

From the Wall Street Journal:

Lawmakers last week questioned Chrysler Chief Executive Robert Nardelli on Cerberus’s commitment to the company. In one exchange with Mr. Nardelli, Sen. Robert Corker (R., Tenn.) criticized the firm. “Cerberus has cash, lots of cash, that it is unwilling to put into this company,” Sen. Corker said.

I’m not sure if Senator Corker was the only one to actually ask the question (I was at work, and am relying on media reports), but plenty of others are objecting to Chrysler getting money. In fact, it’s bipartisan opposition:

If the Senate fails to pass a measure to aid the industry, the House will not act.

That would be fine with Rep. Steve Kagen, D-Appleton. He opposes providing money to Chrysler, which is owned by Cerberus Capital Management LP.

Admittedly, Rep. Kagen’s opposition sounds personal: Another of Cerberus’ companies closed paper mills in his district, but refuses to sell the facilities to investors who want to have a go at running them. But he’s urged other Members of Congress not to give Chrysler any money at all.

It looks like there are Congresscritters who support giving GM and Ford help that object to giving Chrysler help. Whether they’re enough to change the outcome remains to be seen.

Sandra asks…

What is the best way to make money in the stock market for a young investor?

Short term trading or long term investments?
I am new to stock market so any good advises are most welcome. Thank you for reading my question.

John answers:

Before you spend $0.01 on any investment, you must know what you’re doing, why you’re doing it and how to do it. Before you invest in any security, the first investment you should make is in yourself, and the best investment you can make is by educating yourself.

Begin your education by learning why you should invest and the importance of being able to make your own decisions or how the pro’s make theirs. Start your education by reading “Investing or Dummies” by Eric Tyson.
To continue your education select some of the following
Beating the Street by Peter Lynch
Bulls Make Money, Bears Make Money, Pigs Get Slaughtered, by Gallea
From Riches to Rags, by I.C. Freeley
Millionaire Traders, Lein & Schlosberg
How to Make Money in Stocks” by William O’Neil
24 Essential Lessons for Investment Success by William O’Neil
The Intelligent Investor, by Benjamin Graham
Common Stocks, Uncommon Profits, by Philip A. Fisher
One Up on Wall Street by Peter Lynch
Stocks for the Long Run, by Jeremy Siegel
Uncover the Secret Hiding Places of Stock Market Profits by Joel Greenblatt.
What Works on Wall Street by James O’Shaunessey
You Can Be a Stock Market Genius by Joel Greenblatt
Your Money and Your Brain by Jason Zweig

Websites that can provide instructions and help with procedures and terminology are Investopedia – http://www.investopedia.com/ http://www.investorshub.com/ and 1 Source for Stocks – http://www.1source4stocks.com/info/stock-analyst-opinion.asp or Smart Money
http://www.smartmoney.com/
Visit some of the more professional websites like Zacks Research – http://www.zacks.com/ Schaeffer’s http://www.schaeffersresearch.com/ Investors Business Daily – http://www.investors.com/default.htm?fromad=1
Some of these web sites will have advertisers who are worth looking into also. And remember, if they offer free information, get it.

Attend all the free seminars you can, just be careful and don’t get pressured into anything you really don’t want or need. Most schools offer courses in finance and economics, but very few will have courses on the mechanics of the investment markets, if they do try taking the course. You may want to consider on-line courses, the New York Institute of Finance use to have such courses. Try to get some fee information from The stocks exchanges they all have (had) free booklets, SIAC and some of the regulators (FINRA SEC MSRB CBOE) may provide some free literature.

And when you think you want to invest/trade, try some paper trading to test your skills without spending you money http://simulatorinvestopedia.com/ http://www.moneyworks4me.com/
and/or http://www.tradingsimulation.com/

You at least have made the right decision to start investing, this is the first big step and it won’t be your last. Keep taking those steps forward and along the way never take the advice from people that are not in the market or try to tell you not to invest.

Good luck on journey, study hard and you’ll invest well. AND until you learn what you’re doingt DO NOT take specific investment advice from any one here on Y.A based on the wording of your question you did not provide sufficient advice for any one to provide such advice.

Ken asks…

How much do Ron Paul supporters trust the free market?

I am a huge Dr. Paul supporter for many reasons, but i was just wondering if fellow supporters have as much faith in the free market as he does. I know he is usually against regulation and feels the market will regulate itself and i just want to know if the rest of you trust the market when without any regulation the powerful could have free reign. Not that they don’t already with the crony capitalism in Washington.

John answers:

Yes, I trust the free market 100%. In a true free market economy (without any government intrusion) our nations economy would flourish. Unfortunately today our government own’s 75% of the stock in the stock market and influiences trading and manipulates the stocks prices. To see this all you need to do is look at your states Comprehensive Annual Financial Report. In this report buried in the many of useless pages is the states investment in Corporate Stock holdings, and Commercial paper and other nations currencies. Why would a state in the united states use taxpayers money to invest in other nations currencies and Commercial Corporate Stocks, unless they as well as the Federal Government wanted to manipulate the stocks.

This is intrusion and manipulation into the free market by government at it’s worst because government uses taxpayer money to purchase these stock holdings, yet doesn’t pay dividends back to the taxpayers, they place the dividend returns into a seperate OFF-BUDGET ACCOUNT and don’t count this money in the normal budgeting process. There is much more money in these OFF-BUDGET ACCOUNTS then there is taxes and fees paid into the government and this money should be used in the yearly budgeting process, if it was, taxation could literally be phased out altogether and government services could be paid for by the money from dividends in these OFF-BUDGET ACCOUNTS. For more information on this please see CAFR1.com

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